Ross Noble, Freewheeling – Future Cinema

This hairy bloke is called Ross Noble and he's just started a new T.V show which I think is good research to mine & Shoma's Future Cinema unit.

This hairy bloke is called Ross Noble and he’s just started a new T.V show which I think is good research to mine & Shoma’s Future Cinema unit.

This post all came about after talking to Oli Batstone’s house mate, I’ve completely forgotten his name, but he has a funny accent, a beard and is a very nice chap. We were talking this morning about each others units, he’s in his final year, so it’s always good to get some intel on what to expect. I told him the idea behind me and Shoma’s project and he seemed to like it. I told him about the Derren Brown show which explores the mob mentality theory, and how it related to our project.

He then asked me if I’d seen ‘Ross Noble, Freewheeling’ the first episode of which aired the night befor on Dave. However the night in question I turned over just as it was about to start to watch Eastenders… Doh! He advised me to catch up with it, so when I got home I watched the 1st episode online.

The trailer is below to give you an idea.

So I watched the whole thing, and I enjoyed it but I have no idea why, it was totally stupid and random. I think some parts of it were scripted, like when Ross bumps into Mike Skinner (The Streets) in a cafe, but you could tell that the majority of is tasks were unscripted.

It’s also a really clever idea for a show, and I’m surprised that I havn’t seen an attempt at anything similar befor. The whole show relies on the interactions that Ross has on his Twitter account from the general public. For example he’ll tweet “I’m in Swindon, what should I do?” and he’ll get replies like “Come to our garden center and paint a china dog.”

It’s a clever show, becuase he takes part in a lot of really boring activities, yet because of how he managed to take part in them, it throws a funny, real and often awkward spin on the situation.

So this show has got me thinking that maybe Twitter is the ideal route to focus on for our project (social media wise) Obviously it will not be as easy for us to get the ammount of replies that Ross gets, because he has a huge fan base, but If we pitch the idea correctly (maybe in the form of a pilot) then people can start to follow the project.

How to Promote an event – Performance Video

I thought it would be beneficial to research into good promotion for an event both online and offline. I just google searched ‘How to prmote an event’ and one of the fist results to come up was a PDF from Cardiff university.

So I’m gonna read through bits of it and try and learn about effective ways to promote our event at the Winchester.

 

first of all it says you should build a timeline or plan of what you need to do. So this will include the design of flyers and posters, facebook and twitter pages and events, an fit this into to a schedule so you have enough time before the event to drum up some awareness.

The next thing it say about it the content of your promotion, so make sure that you are advertising your event correctly, there’s no point in promoting fine beef burgers for a Vegan BBQ. On this front I think that we have said all the right things in our promotions so far, for example, we give details of the venue, time, date and genre of music that will be played. We have also given the same info online via facebook.

This is how our event looks at the moment.

This is how our event looks at the moment.

I've also pimped out my own facebook profile for Dungeon Dancehall

I’ve also pimped out my own facebook profile for Dungeon Dancehall

The next area that this incredibly interesting PDF focuses on is the audience.

So what is our target audience? Mostly students, we’ve catered for the students by making the event free entry. We also want to cater for all the ‘heads’ out there, by putting out a promo mix, to advertise the type of music that I’ll be playing. There’s also no dress code for the event, because we don’t act like pretentious dick heads… Cameo *cough cough*

Our only rule for the night is that Nicholas Young has to attend in a Kilt, socks and sandles.

The next section of the PDF is tactics. What you actively do to reach those punters. So on the facebook event, I’ve invited everyone on my friends list, even if I don’t like them (business is brutal)

and targeted well known figures in the dubstep scene on Twitter to give us a retweet or two.

We’re currently waiting to print our flyers and posters, but the plan is to have one big poster (A0) size in the front window of the The Winchester, and the other 10 A1 posters, will be dotted around the uni campus and on bus shelters, toilet walls ect.

The flyers are gonna be dished out by the cafe at uni, whilst I do live mixing nearby to get peoples attention.

So that’s the plan so far, here’s a link to the PDF I used. http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/communityengagement/%5Bhidden%5D%20resources/How%20to%20promote%20an%20event.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Practice Sessions – Performance Video

My weekend has involved mixing, and listening to mixes from other DJ’s. It’s been fun.

So on Saturday I woke up with the intention of mixing for most of the day, I fired the decks up and began my mix, I started off slow and very dungeon. Infact the 1st half hour was pretty much the soundtrack to 1000MG’s of Codeine, it was really spacey, almost sub ambient, I was playing a lot of Kryptic Minds (Embedded below to give you an idea) some District and SP:MC.

So If you listened to the track above, that was the general theme of the 1st half an hour of my mix, I love that style so much and if I could i would happily do a night of just that deep, chilling vibe, However I started to switch it around a bit and add some variation to the style, by putting some more tribal sounding tunes (Which again are like nectar to my ears). It increases the energy and they are easier to have a bit of a dance to compared to the stoned, shuffle of the dungeon sound.

As you can hear a lot more upbeat and lively, less slipping into an opiate coma, more swinging through the trees in the amazon. “Tribal is dead… Long live the Jungle.”

So after around another half an hour of the tribal style, It started getting dark, menacing and more volatile as I mix tunes from artists like Biome, Genetix, Commodo & Lurka. When I was dropping these artists in my room, I was getting hype myself.

After this section which I could of kept going for about an hour (but i lost track of time) I like to have a quick break and “escape from the dungeon” play a few uplifting tracks that are nice and chill, an all time personal favourite track to use when I do this is “In the Twighlight” by ‘Phaeleh’. The contrast between the the moody dark and menacing sounds of an artist like ‘Biome’ compared to ‘Phaeleh’ give me a feeling similar to when you have your first Ciggarette of the day, and your mind just relaxes that little bit, it’s bliss.

After this I plummet back into the murky depths, dropping really dark riddims, it’s meditation for axe wielding men in hoods, I carried this on for about 15 minuites and then switched the style more to grime. For me when I mix grime, I prefer to play mostly instrumentals as this makes the vocal tunes stand out more, But either way some instrumental grime tracks are still brutal. This is a personal favourite.

Without going to much into the mixes I did over the weekend, I think it’s time for me to go to bed, chow.

 

 

Spooky Bizzle, Neffa T & Skydro – Performance Video

The other night me and Luke went to a newly opened club in Bournemouth called the ‘Orange Rooms’ I’d heard it was crappy, but that was from the type of people who think that ‘Fuzzy Logic’ at Cameo is a good night… Direct send for Matt Mair… Parrin’ Mair, Parrin’ Mair.

So anyway me and Luke went along to a night at Orange Rooms called ‘Foundation’.

The 1st club night I've enjoyed for all the right reasons in a while... That's an unintentional man pout by the way.

The 1st club night I’ve enjoyed for all the right reasons in a while… That’s an unintentional man pout by the way.

I absolutely loved it the music was mostly grime with some dubstep & garage thrown in, but the quality of the mixing, and the energy that the tracks created really caught my attention.

The 1st DJ we saw was Neffa-T, and he played a set of mostly grime instrumentals and instrumental dubstep tracks… If you know me, you know the type of dubstep I like, and Neffa-T got it spot on.

Neffa-T on the night. personally I could see similarities in his mixing style and mine, picking tracks that were mostly instrumentals and dropping one big track every 10 songs or so.

Neffa-T on the night. personally I could see similarities in his mixing style and mine, picking tracks that were mostly instrumentals and dropping one big track every 10 songs or so.

Neffa-T was accompanied by local M.C, Skydro.

M.C. Skydro.

M.C. Skydro.

I know a quite a lot of people who really don’t like M.C.’s at all, personally i love it when a DJ has an M.C. I think it definately hypes the crowd up, especially if he’s spitting over tracks a warm up DJ is playing, it gets the atmosphere right for the headliners.

This is 'Spooky Bizzle' he's actually not very spooky at all, and im not sure what a 'Bizzle' even is.

This is ‘Spooky Bizzle’ he’s actually not very spooky at all, and im not sure what a ‘Bizzle’ even is.

So what can I say about the set that Spooky Bizzle played? Amazing, energetic & sweaty. He was definately one of the best DJ’s I’ve seen. His mixing style was very different to mine, he covered multiple genres during his set, started off grime, then dubstep, then back to grime, then on to garage and even some house.

Below is the tune ‘Stop Dat’ off of Dizzee Rascal’s 1st album ‘Boy In Da Corner’. Spooky played this just after  he played ‘Next Hype’ by Tempa T and the reaction he got was absolutly insane, I punched the ceiling (it was really low) and started jumping around like a madman, so did everynody else, and it got an instant rewind. It was one of the greatest expereinces that I’ve had in a club.

Working with two Bombaclats (Personal Development) – Performance video.

As a unit, performance video has made me realise just how much I hate people. Especially Shoma Jevons and Luke Chapman (oh and Nicholas Young, he’s not even that young)

Jokes, honestly I love working in a group of people, especially when they’re likeable chaps who can have a good laugh as we work. I think that this unit has bettered (is that a word?) my understanding of who I am, how I work and what makes me tick. If I’m honest I consider my skillset pretty niche, but my interests pretty wide, which is not ideal. For instance I’m shite on photoshop, but I’d love to be able to superimpose an image of Oli Batstone on funny backgrounds. I also love films, yet with a camera, my technical knowledge lacks. Of course these are areas that I should be working on to develop myself and I would love to get better at these things as they are incredibly usefull skills to have, however the interest I have in these areas does not match my love for music. I think that music is incredible because it has varied effects on people, and some one can experience a tune completely differently to somebody else.

An old school picture of me and the Moth, pre - Dungeon Dancehall days. The photo has nothing to do with this post, I just hate to look at type with out sufficient gaps for pictures.

An old school picture of me and the Moth, pre – Dungeon Dancehall days.
The photo has nothing to do with this post, I just hate to look at type with out sufficient gaps for pictures.

I’d say that I’m a creative head instead of a tech head. fantasising over cables memory cards, and framerates just dosn’t make sense to me. I’d rather just think about things I want to see and hear and get pro’s to make the things I can’t do happen. It’s like someone with know knowledge of U bends trying to fix a toilet instead of calling Bartek the plummer.

This is why I feel working in a group benefits me and the overall outcome of what we want to do. As well as this you really do learn and pick up on things when you’re with people who’s interests vary to yours. Not only this but you understand them more as people and understand their perspective.

I was snooping around on Shoma’s blog ‘China’s R Us’ and picked up a quote wich I really liked.

I want to clarify just how unreliable of a source my opinion is, but I thought it was still important for me to share what I believe the generalisation of the sound to be like. First thing that comes to mind is how it is dark in the sense of how suspense music makes you feel, on edge. However in a wired way the tempo and the deep base make the feel of the sound dark but super relaxing in scene. Not relaxing like whale sining but relaxing in the sense if the whale was mutated and was packed with 500 slow pumping hearts was slowly being massaged by a rusty chainsaw would sound relaxing.” – SHOMA JEVONS

The quote above is from social theorist Shoma Jevons, and I liked it because it relates to what I said above… kinda. Shoma admits in his blog that he does not know much about the ‘Dungeon’ sound, but as he has spent more time around me and Luke he has learned more about it, the culture that surrounds the genre, and has developed a liking for the tunes. The same can be said about me and my thoughts on VJ’ing. If you go on a night out to “Bournemouth’s only super club” ‘Gaylo’ they have visual projections which, honestly look cheap, cheesy and not very greezy.

So befor we started the Dungeon Dancehall unit, I didn’t really see how much of an effect they can really have during performances. Shoma and Luke kind of opened my eyes to how visuals can add so much atmosphere to music, I even had a play around with Luke’s MIDI and did some VJ’ing myself which I enjoyed as it was nice and hands on. A great man once said “I prefer the feel of a physical knob” I totally agree.

It’s also great for me to work in a group because I find it usefull too bounce ideas of eachother, I think for instance Luke and Shoma’s knowledge of Mixing music isn’t great however they find tunes and ask if I can work them into a set, the same goes for me, with VJ’ing, compared to the other two, my knowledge is pretty weak, but I’ll find images and see if they can work with them.

I think I can speak for all of us when I also say that it has helped us develop some skills in building a brand and being professional. Now for instance I think of Dungeon Dancehall as a type of brand identity instead of Luke Chapman’s bedroom. We’re also trying to build our promotion skills, at the moment through social media, but also through Posters and Flyers.

Proof of some early days online promotion, in this case via Twitter, we got The Winchester to retweet our event & also a popular DJ & producer from Bournemouth called Funtcase.

Proof of some early days online promotion, in this case via Twitter, we got The Winchester to retweet our event & also a popular DJ & producer from Bournemouth called Funtcase.

 

 

 

 

Inside the Dungeon – Performance Video

Here’s a few snaps from our meeting with Louise at The Winchester.

Me and Luke chewing the fat with Louise at The Winchester. Photo by Shoma Jevons

Me and Luke chewing the fat with Louise at The Winchester. Photo by Shoma Jevons

So as I said befor the venue looks great, possibly a little too big, as it can hold around 400 people with both rooms being used, we are only going to use the front room however.

Looks Dungeon. This is where we are going to be performing on the Night, the stage has a Portable DJ booth and the screen can be made larger to fit the whole length.

Looks Dungeon.
This is where we are going to be performing on the Night, the stage has a Portable DJ booth and the screen can be made larger to fit the whole length. As well as the speekers that you can see there are also some hanging from the roof.

This is a really artistic shot of the projector at The Winchester. apparantly it sync's up to a laptop with out wires... It all sounds rather confusing to me.

This is a really artistic shot of the projector at The Winchester. apparantly it sync’s up to a laptop with out wires… It all sounds rather confusing to me.

During the talk with Louise we asked if we could do a sound check and have a bit of a practice at the venue during a week day, this will be really benefitial to me, because I’ve never played on a big sound system, so it will take a bit of time to get used to the different sound of track E.Q’s and the positioning of the speakers. It’ll also give us an opportunity to set up all our equipment, I think that at the moment as well as my laptop and mixer, we’ll have to bring one of the sound decks from uni, because the house sound systems run off and XLR input & output. which for some reason Pioneer didn’t think would be an important input to put on my unit. So I think what I’ll have to do is plug my mixer into the uni’s sound deck via audio jack input and run the sound through one channel on that and then use the sound decks XLR output to plug into the house system. Honestly my techincal knowledge isn’t that great, I know how to mix tunes, I’m not a sound engineer.

Another alternative would be to purchase a audio jack to XLR cable, but I’d have to find out if i needed the male or female connection.

If all else fails and this dosn’t work then we’ll have to use the uni’s speakers, which will still get the job done, but they really won’t have the same power as the Winchester’s system.

Another reason why the tests at the venue will be important is for the VJ’s to set up how Modul8 will react to the higer decibles and frequencies of the House sound system, at the moment they are all programmed to work on relatively small speakers.

 

 

 

Social Media (Big Up Doublel M.C) – Performance Video

This is DoubleL M.C. He's a resident M.C at Bournemouth's biggest dubstep night Dub Optic and he just shared our event!

This is DoubleL M.C.
He’s a resident M.C at Bournemouth’s biggest dubstep night Dub Optic and he just shared our event!

So I hit this guy up on facebook as I know he’ll have loads of friends and subscribers following him, and he just shared our event which is great. Big Ups.

I’m gonna try and hit some more heads up on social media, but I don’t want to pester people as I do it.